Chaos Day courtesy of David Hussman of DevJam Studios. This one-day event brought together members of a small but growing community of software engineers in the wonderfully hip basement of Studio 2 in chilly Minneapolis. Business Agility / The Guardian Podcast
Chaos Day courtesy of David Hussman of DevJam Studios. This one-day event brought together members of a small but growing community of software engineers in the wonderfully hip basement of Studio 2 in chilly Minneapolis.

Chaos Day courtesy of David Hussman of DevJam Studios. This one-day event brought together members of a small but growing community of software engineers in the wonderfully hip basement of Studio 2 in chilly Minneapolis. Imagine the Worst Possible Scenario & Repair It In Advance

Imagine the Worst Possible Scenario & Repair It In Advance. On my latest podcast I welcome back one of the most popular and listened to guests on the program, David Hussman. Of course, David is well known for presentations and leadership in the evolution of agility. Having recently sold DevJam, David is a busy man these days with an extremely active mind. Our talk for the podcast was an interesting and engaging conversation for me and I am confident it will be for you too. Here is what I mean. The Guardian Podcast is generally 30 minutes long. This one went 42 minutes. That the podcast went 12 minutes over time is an indication of how much I enjoyed talking with and listening to David. To hear the entire podcast go to www.rynmelberg.com, my iTunes page at https://goo.gl/cQRnhD, or the Sound Cloud page at https://goo.gl/gGHtiZ.

Chaos Community Day Twin Cities Chaos Community Day is quite a title, but as I suspected it was not a conference to celebrate a lack of order. So what was Chaos Day? As David explained, Chaos Community Day started at Amazon from irreverent behavior from a person nicknamed ‘the master of disaster’. He was an alpha programmer who would go into server rooms and start unplugging things just to see what would happen. When people questioned him about why he was doing this and why, he would respond with ‘the fact that you are bothered by this is a problem, because things are going to go wrong’. To hear the podcast click here: David Hussman Discusses Chaos Engineering with Ryn Melberg.

From its informal start, the idea of managing crises by seeing what would happen when servers were unplugged led to the invention of the Chaos Monkey. At about that same time the first Chaos Community Day occurred, which David said was in San Francisco. While not at the initial event, David was invited to the second Chaos Community Day along with companies like Google, Netflix and Amazon. He and his fellow conference attendees found that there were many parallels between chaos engineering and the act of using an inoculation help humans build immunity to a virus.

Preventing disease with vaccines involves giving people a small amount of the virus; of course it seems a bit counterintuitive but we all know it works. You give a human a bit of a virus because we are afraid of catching the disease caused by the virus and as a result of limited exposure he/she develops immunity. So think of immunity and managing chaotic situations as similar. Instead of immunity, engineers want more reliability and resiliency in programmed systems. To inoculate an organization against breakage and make systems more resilient, chaos engineering injects fault to to see how hardware, software and people respond, and to discover what is unknown. Most importantly this type of work is not simply imagining a response but develops workable solutions based on events from the actual operation.

With his full geek engaged (his words) David collaborated with Leah Cunningham to organize a Chaos Community Day in The Twin Cities and is now helping to start a meetup on the topic: https://www.meetup.com/Twin-Cities-Chaos-Engineering-Community/ Don’t get too hung up on the word chaos. The process is not chaotic in the same way that a flu shot is not the flu. It’s a great interview and I urge you to listen to the entire thing at www.rynmelberg.com, my iTunes page at https://goo.gl/cQRnhD, or the Sound Cloud page at https://goo.gl/gGHtiZ.

Now then, we are making some changes to the web site and tweaking the direction the podcast is going. In 2018 I will be talking more about topics like the one here. Nothing wrong with what we did before, I just think we need to evolve as my interests and work change along with those of the audience. So I will be busy reorganizing for a few weeks, but have no fear. The Guardian Podcast will return and sooner than you think. Imagine the Worst Possible Scenario & Repair It In Advance.Imagine the Worst Possible Scenario & Repair It In Advance. Imagine the Worst Possible Scenario & Repair It In Advance.Imagine the Worst Possible Scenario & Repair It In Advance.


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